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Susan Horton

Economist

Publications

Perspective Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Food Security and Nutrition Perspective, Horton Hoddinott

Nutrition has always been a key development indicator. Inadequate nutrition is a major contributory factor for child mortality; good nutrition is important both for healthy growth and cognitive development. Cognitive development itself leads to educational success, and both are important determinants of labour productivity and hence economic growth. Balance is also important: there should be neither under- nor over-nutrition.

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Assessment Paper

A Scorecard for Humanity: Malnutrition, Horton Steckel

By Sue Horton and Richard H. Steckel. Hunger, one of humanity’s oldest scourges, has relented. The researchers measured it through height, a strong indicator of childhood starvation. They find that humanity's made magnificent progress, but it also shows there is still much to do.

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Best Practice Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Deworming Best Practice, Hall Horton

By Andrew Hall & Sue Horton In the Copenhagen Consensus 2008 the Expert panel ranked five nutritional interventions among the top ten of 30 proposals to answer the question, what would be the...

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Best Practice Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Micronutrient Fortification Best Practice, Horton et al

Fortification with iron and iodine, two minerals needed in small quantities in daily diets, was ranked as a top public health intervention priority for countries using benefit‐cost analysis.

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Best Practice Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Micronutrient Supplements for Child Survival Best Practice, Horton et al

By Sue Horton, France Begin, Alison Greig & Anand Lakshman The 2008 Copenhagen Consensus ranked micronutrient supplements as the top development priority out of more than 40 interventions...

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Assessment Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Hunger and Malnutrition Assessment, Horton Alderman Rivera

Despite significant reductions in income poverty in recent years, undernutrition remains widespread. Recent estimates from UNICEF (2006) are that “one out of every four children under five – or 146 million children in the developing world – is underweight for his or her age."

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