Copenhagen Consensus Center
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Expert advice to do the most good

The Copenhagen Consensus Center is a think tank that publicizes the best ways for governments and philanthropists to spend their money based on hard facts. We add rational arguments and economic thinking to the global debate on development, aid money, and the environment by providing policy analysis and prioritization. 

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Expert advice to do the most good

The Copenhagen Consensus Center is a think tank that publicizes the best ways for governments and philanthropists to spend their money based on hard facts. We add rational arguments and economic thinking to the global debate on development, aid money, and the environment by providing policy analysis and prioritization. 

Read more

About us

The Copenhagen Consensus Center (CCC) is a nonprofit organization. We commission and conduct new research and analysis into competing spending priorities.

In particular we focus on the international community's effort to solve the world's biggest challenges and on how to do this in the most cost-efficient manner.

We create a framework in which solutions to the world's big problems are prioritized explicitly, with the goal of achieving the most 'good' for people and the planet.

We work with governments, NGOs and multilateral organizations on projects around the world.

The idea is simple, yet often neglected; when financial resources are limited, it is necessary to prioritize the effort. Every day, policymakers and business leaders at all levels prioritize by investing in one project instead of another. However, instead of being based on facts, science, and calculations, many vital decisions are based on political motives or even the possibility of media coverage.

"That’s where you can make the greatest difference, where every dollar you spend is liable to have the greatest impact."- Bill Gates

The Copenhagen Consensus approach improves knowledge and gives an overview of research and facts within a given problem, which means that the prioritization is based on evidence. In the late 2002 the Copenhagen Consensus approach originated from a small group of people headed by Bjørn Lomborg, then Director of the Danish Environmental Assessment Institute.

During 2003, an outline for a global conference was created. In May 2004, the first Copenhagen Consensus Conference took place in Copenhagen, Denmark, and brought together eight of the World's leading economists, including 4 Nobel Laureates and 30 of the world's top specialists within ten problem areas.

This was followed by the Copenhagen Consensus United Nations at Georgetown University, which brought together United Nations ambassadors. Copenhagen Consensus United Nations UNICEF built on this success. In 2006, the Consulta de San José saw a focus on Latin American and Caribbean issues.

The global Copenhagen Consensus was repeated in 2008 at the Copenhagen Consensus 2008. CC08 followed up on CC04 and took stock of the world's problems and proposed cost-efficient solutions to mitigate the negative consequences of those problems.

In 2009, the Copenhagen Consensus Center worked on the Denmark Consensus, the Copenhagen Consensus on Climate, and malnutrition conferences in New York and Nairobi, at which new research was released on ways to effectively combat micronutrient deficiencies.

In addition, the Copenhagen Consensus Center continues to work with international organizations and policy makers to develop projects of national and international concern. An example of this is the RethinkHIV project; the first-ever comprehensive cost-benefit analysis of responses to HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa, conducted by Copenhagen Consensus Center in 2011.

In May 2012, the Expert Panel of Nobel Laureate economists met again for Copenhagen Consensus 2012, to engage with the prominent economist scholars who had drafted pioneering cost-benefit analysis for 12 global challenges.

Since its inception in 2006 until end of 2011, the Copenhagen Consensus Center has received funding from the Danish state. Where recent projects have received any additional funding, you can find that information on our website under the descriptions of those projects.