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Education

Summaries and download links to all our research papers on Education below.

Publications

Viewpoint Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Viewpoint, Save the Children

There is no doubt that smart investments must be made in seeking to maximise available resources to advance access to quality education in the next period.

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Viewpoint Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Viewpoint, Education International

While it is important to analyse the feasibility of prospective targets, the paper does not present sufficient analysis for the conclusion to be drawn that “the vast majority of the post-201

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Perspective Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Perspective, Orazem

52% of all primary-aged children who are not attending school are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Perspective Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Perspective, Krafft Glewwe

The issue of education quality is important but priorities for cost-effective interventions are difficult to set.

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Assessment Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Assessment, Psacharopoulos

Unsurprisingly, the MDG targets that are not likely to be achieved by 2015 are repeated with 2030 as a new target date.

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Working Paper

Preliminary Benefit-Cost Assessment for 12th Session OWG Goals

The Copenhagen Consensus has updated our benefit-cost assessment of UN Post-2015 Millennium Development Goals for the 12th session of the Open Working Group.  The Copenhagen Consensus wi

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Working Paper

Preliminary Benefit-Cost Assessment for 11th Session OWG Goals

Some of the world’s top economists have assessed the targets from the 11th session Open Working Group document into one of five categories, based on economic evidence: Phenomenal, Good, Fair, Poor and Uncertain.

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Assessment Paper

A Scorecard for Humanity: Education

By Harry Anthony Patrinos and George Psacharopoulos. Illiteracy today afflicts 23.6% of the world's population. Yet, in 1900 perhaps 70% were illiterate. By 2050, it is estimated illiteracy will reach about 12%.

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Perspective Paper

Education Perspective 2

By Lant Pritchett. Pritchett provided a Perspective Paper in response to Peter Orazem's Assessment Paper on Education for CC12.

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Perspective Paper

Education Perspective 1

George Psacharopoulos prepared one of the two Perspective Papers for Copenhagen Consensus 2012 on the topic of Education. His work responds to Peter Orazem's Assessment paper.

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Assessment Paper

Third Copenhagen Consensus: Education

By Peter F. Orazem. Over the past 50 years, remarkable progress has been made ensuring that children receive basic education. More than sixty percent of adults in low-income countries can read and write, whereas in 1962, just one-third were literate.

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Best Practice Paper

Lowering the Price of Schooling

By Peter F. Orazem, Paul Glewwe and Harry Patrinos. In almost all countries of the world, schooling raises earnings. This is true in developing as well as developed countries. Similar returns to schooling are found for both urban and rural residents and for both women and men. The median increase in earnings varies from 8‐10% per added year of schooling.

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Perspective Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Education Perspective 2

Lant Pritchett provided a Perspective Paper on Education in response to the Assessment Paper by Orazem, Glewwe, and Patrinos.

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Perspective Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Education 1

Victor Lavy's Perspective Paper on Education for Copenhagen Consensus serves as a response to the Assessment Paper produced by Orazem, Glewwe, and Patrinos.

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Assessment Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Education

By Peter F. Orazem, Paul Glewwe, and Harry Patrinos. Building human capital by developing literate populations is a key driver for further economic growth. Interventions to encourage the 14.4 million children who drop out of primary education to complete grade 5 would cost $3.6 billion and be highly cost effective.

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Assessment Paper

Copenhagen Consensus Latin America: Education

By Amy Damon and Paul Glewwe. This paper briefly describes the progress and problems of education in Latin American and Caribbean countries, and then proposes three types of policies to increase education outcomes: nutrition programs for infants and very young children; conditional cash transfer programs; and vouchers that can be used to attend private schools.

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Bill Gates for a Day: Education presentation

Peter Orazem presented his findings on the topic of lack of education at the Bill Gates for a Day conference in March 2007.

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Assessment Paper

Bill Gates for a Day: Education

This paper reviews the stylized facts regarding the distribution of human capital investments and the returns to those investments in developing countries.

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Perspective Paper

Copenhagen Consensus: Education Perspective 2

An Assessment Paper on Governance and Corruption was prepared for the 2004 Copenhagen Consensus by Lant Pritchett.

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Perspective Paper

Copenhagen Consensus: Education Perspective 1

An Assessment Paper on Governance and Corruption was prepared for the Copenhagen Consensus by Lant Pritchett.

Paul Schultz and Ludger Woessmann wrote Perspective Papers in response.

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Assessment Paper

Copenhagen Consensus: Education

An Assessment Paper on Governance and Corruption was prepared for the 2004 Copenhagen Consensus by Lant Pritchett. 

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Projects

A Scorecard for Humanity

A Scorecard for Humanity fits into the ongoing conversation between optimists and pessimists for the last half century. The central question has been: what is the state of the world? The results of our study have been published by Cambridge University Press under the book title How Much Have Global Problems Cost the World? A Scorecard from 1900 to 2050

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Copenhagen Consensus

The Copenhagen Consensus was our first project. The basic idea was to improve prioritization of the numerous problems the world faces, by gathering some of the world's greatest economists to a meeting where some of the biggest challenges in the world would be assessed.

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Copenhagen Consensus III

In 2004 and 2008, the Copenhagen Consensus Center held two major projects that helped to shape overseas development spending and philanthropic decisions for years to come. The third Copenhagen Consensus was the latest iteration of our ongoing work to prioritize the best solutions.

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Guide to Giving

Even the wealthiest government, business, or individual has limited resources. A dollar spent in one place cannot be spent elsewhere. We are often asked by individuals: how can I make personal donations in line with Copenhagen Consensus findings? This Guide provides an answer.

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Post-2015 Consensus

In 2015, the UN's Millennium Development Goals are expiring and the international community will set new goals. The Post-2015 Consensus brings together the world’s top economists, NGOs, international agencies and businesses to identify the goals with the greatest benefit-to-cost ratio for the next development agenda.

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Copenhagen Consensus II

The second Copenhagen Consensus took place 25-30 May in Copenhagen. Once again, our Expert Panel tackled the question, Imagine you had $75 billion to donate to worthwhile causes. What would you do, and where should we start? The Panel released a prioritized list recommending how best to tackle ten of the world's most pressing issues.

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Copenhagen Consensus for Latin America

Copenhagen Consensus for Latin America and the Carribean took place in San José, Costa Rica, 22-25 October 2007 at the INCAE Business School, Alajuela, in cooperation with the Inter-American Development Bank

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Copenhagen Consensus Georgetown

Copenhagen Consensus 2006 followed a similar procedure to the first Copenhagen Consensus, drawing on the earlier exercise. Representatives had available to them the materials from the previous meeting, and over two days heard new presentations from acknowledged economists and UN experts for each of the ten challenge areas.

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