Ghana Priorities
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Ghana Priorities research explores the smartest solutions to help Ghana, covering themes from poverty and health to education, infrastructure, and gender equality.

Starting in March 2020 we will begin publishing this ground-breaking research. Scroll down to discover the published research papers and continue checking back each week to find the latest publications. 

Ghana Priorities: Urban Transportation (Ferry)

The Problem Ghana has had a period of significant economic growth. They have also experienced steady population growth between 2.4% and 2.7% over the past few decades. In the face of this growth,...

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Ghana Priorities: Urban Transportation (Bus)

The Problem Accra is a growing city with increasing congestion and longer commute times. The city has experienced an average growth rate of 2% over the past ten years and is expected to continue...

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Ghana Priorities: Rural Transportation

The Problem The economic growth literature suggests that the volume of infrastructure stock as well as its quality positively and impacts economic growth by, among others, decreasing the cost of...

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Ghana Priorities: Rural Sanitation

The Problem Despite significant government and development partner efforts, Ghana has struggled to improve latrine coverage in rural areas. Since the start of the Millennium Development Goal period...

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Ghana Priorities: Rural Electrification

The problem According to Ghana Energy Commission (2019), the electricity access rate in rural areas was 67.2% in 2018. The recently published Ghana Living Standards Survey (Ghana Statistical Service...

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Ghana Priorities: Industrialization

Intervention 1: Set up an integrated Bauxite Authority to Facilitate the Processing of Ghana’s Bauxite into Alumina and its Conversion into Aluminium ingots using the VALCO Smelter Ghana's economic...

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Ghana Priorities: Illegal Mining

The Problem Artisanal and Small-Scale gold Mining (ASM) is an important economic activity in several gold-rich developing countries around the world (Kahhat et al., 2019). In Ghana, ASM has provided...

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Ghana Priorities: Health Access

The Problem The health status of Ghanaians has evolved over time, from predominant inflictions from infectious diseases and negative maternal and child health outcomes that prevailed at the time of...

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Ghana Priorities: Fecal Treatment and Reuse

The Problem In Ghana, the prevalence of onsite sanitation is more than 85%. This means that when the receptacles containing the faecal sludge are full they have to be collected and treated before...

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Ghana Priorities: Family Planning

The Problem Unplanned pregnancies, including teenage pregnancy, perpetuated by low demand for, and lack of access to family planning are linked with higher risks of birth complications such as...

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Ghana Priorities: Education Quality

The Problem Ghana has made great strides in education enrolment in the MDG and SDG era, with near universal primary school enrolment and equality between boys and girls (World Bank, 2019). However,...

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Ghana Priorities: Digitization

The Problem A key indicator of successful decentralization processes is the ability of local governments to generate their own income. Although Ghana’s fiscal decentralization framework allows for...

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Ghana Priorities: Agriculture

Intervention I – Subsidising Improved Seeds Overview For various reasons, many smallholder farmers in Ghana do not use improved seeds, which are not only more resilient but also provide higher yields...

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Ghana Priorities: Urbanisation

The Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA) is suffering from a major urban infrastructure gap. The region’s increasing economic growth has triggered rapid urbanization, characterized by expansion of built-up...

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Ghana Priorities: Industrial Policy

The Problem Although Ghana has witnessed some impressive growth in recent times, past experiences with industrialization have not been as expected. There are several reasons for this: informality,...

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Ghana Priorities: Land Titles

The Problem Poverty remains a problem in Ghana. There is an overall reduction in national poverty over the last 3 decades, but this masks the persistent spatial concentration of poverty and high...

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Ghana Priorities: report on COVID-19 responses

This study calculates the social and economic costs and benefits of a hypothetical moderate lockdown of 9 months, including school closures, reducing social contacts by 30-50% in Ghana. Such a...

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Ghana Priorities: Youth Unemployment

The Problem Integration of the youth (15- to 34-year-olds) in Ghana, who represents 35 percent of the population, into full and productive employment can be an important driver for growth and...

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Ghana Priorities: Education (SHS)

Although the free senior high school (SHS) policy has greatly increased enrolment, it has led to a mismatch in the demand for secondary education and the available educational infrastructure. The double-track system was introduced to circumvent this hurdle.

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Ghana Priorities: Urban Sanitation

The Problem Urban sanitation coverage in Ghana like in many other developing countries is low with only 25% of the people with access to basic sanitation (improved, non-shared sanitation) (Appiah-...

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Ghana Priorities: Fisheries

The Problem Fish is an important source of animal protein in developing coastal countries, including Ghana. Within the West African region, fish protein constitutes about one-third of animal protein...

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Ghana Priorities: Gender

Child marriage forces girls to assume adult responsibilities even though they are not physically, emotionally, psychologically and mentally ready for such responsibility. The result has been harmful to these girls, their children, families and the community, making it a priority to eliminate it globally.

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Ghana Priorities: Hypertension

The Problem In recent years, Ghana, like many other developing countries has been going through an epidemiologic transition where the proportion of deaths from non-communicable diseases is rapidly...

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Ghana Priorities: Mental Health

The Problem With a population of nearly 30 million people, WHO estimates that approximately 13% of the population in Ghana suffer from a mental disorder, of which 3% suffer from a severe mental...

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Ghana Priorities: Tuberculosis

TB is responsible for around 5 percent of total deaths in Ghana annually, and the decline in TB burden is markedly slow, with an average 2.5 percent reduction in TB incidence year on year (GTB 2018). TB mainly affects the working-age population of Ghana (73 percent* incident cases aged 15-44 in 2018), and as many as 70 percent of individuals with TB disease in a given year don’t access TB treatment.

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Ghana Priorities: Malaria

The Problem According to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD), malaria represents the largest cause of death and morbidity in the country as measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) (IHME,...

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Ghana Priorities: Maternal and Child Health

Over the last three decades, Ghana has invested large amounts of effort in implementing various strategies to reduce maternal and child mortality in the country.

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Ghana Priorities: LPG Cooking

Over 1.6 million people died globally in 2017 from harmful exposure to PM2.5 emissions from household use of solid fuels such as wood, coal, charcoal, and agricultural residues for cooking according to estimates by the Global Burden of Disease 2017 (GBD 2017) Project. This makes household air pollution (HAP) one of the leading health risk factors in developing countries.

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Ghana Priorities: Poverty

The Problem Poverty remains a problem. There is an overall reduction in national poverty over the last 3 decades, but this masks the persistent spatial concentration of poverty and high inequality...

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Ghana Priorities: Nutrition

Ghana is considered one of the few success stories on the African continent regarding child nutrition. The rates of child growth faltering (indicated as stunting, wasting, and underweight) has declined steadily at the national level.

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